Hey! Who Got Into The Candy?!

Do you have a rodent problem?

Before you blame one of your kids for eating part of the candy bar in the top drawer, perhaps you should first consider rodents. After all, your home is very attractive to rodents – comfortable, cozy, and filled with plenty of snacks for the whole family.

House mice live in groups, so where there is one, there are likely many brothers, sisters, and cousins nearby. In favorable conditions, such as your house, a mouse can live for six years. Females are capable of reproducing just twenty-eight days after birth and will breed all year long, producing twelve young per litter. The math says that two mice can turn into 2,000 over the course of one year!

Rats and other larger rodents also enjoy the comforts of your home. The most common rat we see in this area is the Norway Rat. The Norway Rat will also reproduce all year long. A female will have six to eight litters per year and can produce five to fourteen offspring per litter! If the Norway Rat has found its way into your home, you may find an entire family living in your garage or shed.

To answer the original question — if you have a rodent problem, an infestation is right around the corner.


What Are Quick Inspection Points A Homeowner Can Search For To Stop The Invasion?

Unfortunately, most people realize they have a problem when they find fecal droppings.

The best spots to look for droppings can be:

  • Under sinks
  • Kitchen cabinets
  • Drawers
  • Utility rooms
  • Pantries
  • Behind refrigerators
  • In garages or sheds

Mice are excellent climbers, so make sure to look both high and low. You will also want to check around the exterior of your home for entry points. Common spots are around the air conditioner, corners of garage doors, and gas lines. Any opening that is bigger than your pinky finger will need to be sealed off with steel wool and/or foam. Again, remember to look high and low.

Mice are excellent climbers, so make sure to look both high and low. You will also want to check around the exterior of your home for entry points. Common spots are around the air conditioner, corners of garage doors, and gas lines. Any opening that is bigger than your pinky finger will need to be sealed off with steel wool and/or foam. Again, remember to look high and low.

Rodents prefer clutter to keep them unseen and protected. Limiting clutter is important both indoors and outdoors. Try trimming back bushes, raking away leaves, and moving woodpiles away from the house. If you leave pet food in your home, it is best to keep it stored in a sealed container. These steps will reduce the possibility of drawing rodents into your home with the lure of easy access to a snack.

When your kid denies being a candy thief, start checking for droppings — and if you need assistance protecting (or reconquering) your home, call the experts at American Pest Management, Inc.